mama campo

Project Design
Manolo Yllera

Photography
Manolo Yllera

Place
Madrid. Spain

 

An organic restaurant serving mock tender, soupy rice or stew pot? Why not, in the end being organic is not synonymous with being vegan as well as eating meat does not prevent from being sustainable either. This is the starting point of the food shop and restaurant Mama Campo, an initiative promoted by Nacho Aparicio and David Yllera. “There is neither tofu nor quinoa or rare seeds here”, Aparicio states, because Mama Campo only sells local products and its kitchen only produces typical Spanish dishes. And so tradition and proximity are its two fundamental premises, but there are some more no less important. For example, there is the will to change the widespread idea of “organic” to free it from restrictions and make it accessible to everyone: to those who keep the dictates of vegetarian religion, to the inveterate carnivorous, to people suffering from food intolerance or to those who are simply concerned about having a balanced diet. Everyone is welcome in Mama Campo.

Nacho had known David some time ago because “he was one of my clients. I was working in a publicity agency and he was in a multinational food company. One day we started talking about doing something related to organic nutrition. I told him we should open an organic shop and restaurant affordable to everybody and why not, aesthetically beautiful”. To this end, they trusted in David’s brother, the photographer Manolo Yllera, who is not just brilliant in his job, but also has many contacts within the furniture and design industry. He took care even of the smallest details and as a result, Mama Campo is a roundup of amazing designer pieces and artworks. “Every decorative element belongs to some designer. Nothing was left to chance and this grants the space the personality we were looking for. We have chairs designed by Tusquets, Marteen Baas or Bouroullec, lamps by Carlos Villoslada, Bocci or the Pet Lamp by Álvaro Catalán de Ocón, etc.”, Aparicio explains.

In total, about 40 national designers came together in Mama Campo, such as Pablo Limón, Pilar de Prada, Buenaventura, En-ticDesigns, La Casita de Margaux or Expormim, providing Fontal armchairs by Oscar Tusquets. But there were also international names like Wow Studio, Dirk Van der Kooij or Tom Dixon and certain original touches which are impossible to overlook such as the rolling pins used as door handles or the fridges covered with the remainders of pallets. Even the silverware and aprons belong to designer labels. They spare no expense because “we wanted to guarantee the presence of our brand and make people overcome the fear of all that labelled as organic”. This is the reason why they created a light-filled space, warm and pleasant, with plentiful of handicrafts close at hand and oozing design left, right and centre. Taste buds and smell are not the only senses stimulated in here. The space also tries to activate aesthetic pleasure and ecological awareness with the aim of communicating principles as important as sustainability or recycling. One-of-a-kind model of organic business indeed.

Project Design
Manolo Yllera

Photography
Manolo Yllera

Place
Madrid. Spain

 

An organic restaurant serving mock tender, soupy rice or stew pot? Why not, in the end being organic is not synonymous with being vegan as well as eating meat does not prevent from being sustainable either. This is the starting point of the food shop and restaurant Mama Campo, an initiative promoted by Nacho Aparicio and David Yllera. “There is neither tofu nor quinoa or rare seeds here”, Aparicio states, because Mama Campo only sells local products and its kitchen only produces typical Spanish dishes. And so tradition and proximity are its two fundamental premises, but there are some more no less important. For example, there is the will to change the widespread idea of “organic” to free it from restrictions and make it accessible to everyone: to those who keep the dictates of vegetarian religion, to the inveterate carnivorous, to people suffering from food intolerance or to those who are simply concerned about having a balanced diet. Everyone is welcome in Mama Campo.

Nacho had known David some time ago because “he was one of my clients. I was working in a publicity agency and he was in a multinational food company. One day we started talking about doing something related to organic nutrition. I told him we should open an organic shop and restaurant affordable to everybody and why not, aesthetically beautiful”. To this end, they trusted in David’s brother, the photographer Manolo Yllera, who is not just brilliant in his job, but also has many contacts within the furniture and design industry. He took care even of the smallest details and as a result, Mama Campo is a roundup of amazing designer pieces and artworks. “Every decorative element belongs to some designer. Nothing was left to chance and this grants the space the personality we were looking for. We have chairs designed by Tusquets, Marteen Baas or Bouroullec, lamps by Carlos Villoslada, Bocci or the Pet Lamp by Álvaro Catalán de Ocón, etc.”, Aparicio explains.

In total, about 40 national designers came together in Mama Campo, such as Pablo Limón, Pilar de Prada, Buenaventura, En-ticDesigns, La Casita de Margaux or Expormim, providing Fontal armchairs by Oscar Tusquets. But there were also international names like Wow Studio, Dirk Van der Kooij or Tom Dixon and certain original touches which are impossible to overlook such as the rolling pins used as door handles or the fridges covered with the remainders of pallets. Even the silverware and aprons belong to designer labels. They spare no expense because “we wanted to guarantee the presence of our brand and make people overcome the fear of all that labelled as organic”. This is the reason why they created a light-filled space, warm and pleasant, with plentiful of handicrafts close at hand and oozing design left, right and centre. Taste buds and smell are not the only senses stimulated in here. The space also tries to activate aesthetic pleasure and ecological awareness with the aim of communicating principles as important as sustainability or recycling. One-of-a-kind model of organic business indeed.

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